How To Build An Aquaponics System: Video Tutorial

In this video we will show you the basic set-up of our aquaponics system, and introduce you to some tips to build your own.

You can visit our website at http://www.experimentsinaquaponics.org for detailed information on all the parts you will need for the build and for maintenance advice, growing tips and fish care.

Aquaponics is a system of raising fish and plants in a symbiotic cycle. Fish waste acts as a natural fertiliser, the plants absorb these nutrients, and the water remains clean for the fish. The only input in our systems are food for the fish. No watering (apart from evaporation top-up) or pesticides are required and the process is completely organic.

Web: http://www.experimentsinaquaponics.org
Twitter: http://twitter.com/ARTaquaponics

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WELCOME BACK: THE TOUR

Aquaponics integrated into the urban landscape? Look no further than your imagination. To join us on a tour please view the full departure schedule by CLICKING HERE.

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Event Announcement: AQUANAILS

AQUANAILS

Get your nails done for FREE and learn all about aquaponics. Receive a free Quick Start guide and visit our system. Email appointments@experimentsinaquaponics.org for further info and to book an appointment.

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Tilapia Care in Aquaponics

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Tilapia were our fish of choice for our larger aquaponic system. Not only do they taste good they are pretty easy to look after and are a hardy fish that can withstand a drop in ideal water parameters. Before keeping them however, there are some important basics to get to know.

Temperature: Tilapia require heated water, especially here in the UK! 28°C is the ideal temperature and this can be achieved with an ordinary aquarium heater that is the right size for your tank. A few degrees either way probably won’t make much difference but they definitely cannot stand extended periods of colder water.

Oxygen: Water dropping from the grow bed into the fish tank will agitate the water surface and allow for an exchange of gases, oxygenating the water. It is a good idea to add an extra air stone incase your system is on a timer and the water goes still for long period of time. If you spot any fish gasping at the surface definitely try adding another air stone. Tilapia also use oxygen to metabolise their food making the need for an air pump even more important.

Feeding: It’s always best to get a good quality feed especially made for tilapia. It’s also possible to feed them directly from your system, or incorporate growing something like duckweed that be fed straight to the fish. Tilapia can be mostly vegetarian although in their earlier development they need a lot more protein. Feeding smaller amounts spread throughout the day will be easier on the system and more regular for the fish. We are using an automatic feeder for when we aren’t around to make sure they get their feed. We are feeding 3 to 4 times per day and only what they can eat in a few minutes, if there is food being left by the fish cut back on the food per feeding. Amount of food to be given will change as the tilapia grow, it’s important not to underfeed them!

Stocking Density: Without going into specifics of gram per cubic foot, a general answer is one adult tilapia per 10 litres. We have taken this rule as the absolute maximum and have stocked under this amount.

Water Parameters: While I mentioned tilapia being a hardy fish this is no excuse to keep slack water parameters! It just means if there is a slip up or a pump stops working there is some leeway to fixing to problem. Ammonia and nitrite should be at 0 ppm to keep the fish in optimum health. Nitrate should be kept under control with regular testing to make sure the plants are doing their job and taking this from the water.

Sourcing: Our tilapia have come from Fish Farm UK based in Bow. They deliver to other places in the UK and we highly recommend them. Most sizes are available at a reasonable rate and they care about their fish! A quick online search will provide other suppliers.

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Starting Your Seedlings In Clay Pebbles

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There wasn’t much about the success rate of starting off seedlings in clay pebbles in any of the aquaponics resources I researched, but I thought I would give it a go as transplanting a clay pebble pot straight into an aquaponics grow bed is much less disruptive to the plants than washing soil off the roots and redistributing them in different media.

Whilst I was waiting for my aquaponics system to properly cycle I started off some spinach, pak choi and basil, in the same clay media as my grow bed. I also grew some seeds in soil to monitor the difference. Obviously as the soil has more nutrients after about 10 days the soil plants started to grow much faster, however once in the system the plants in the pebbles were eventually much stronger than the soil plants. I think having all the roots washed and rearranged in pebbles did not leave the plants in a happy mood and in-fact some of the wilted and perished! This did not happen with any of my pebble seedlings.

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VERDICT: Start off your seedlings in the same growing media as your system. Plant them in a pot with holes in the bottom so you can pop them straight in your grow bed. Grow them for about two weeks (or until the roots poke out the pot) before putting them in the main bed, and if possible water them with the same water that is in your system BUT only if it is fully cycled.

TIP: A heated seed tray helps development and of course lots of light is beneficial.